AN INTERVIEW WITH TOSSER

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       Since the release of their self-titled EP a mere few months ago, DC-based alternative band Tosser has no intentions of slowing down. Melted got the chance to talk to frontman, and mastermind behind the project, Eric Zidar, about the origins of the band, their winter tour with Marblemouth, and his writing process.
 

TELL US ABOUT YOUR DEBUT EP.

      I’d start by recording ideas in my basement into an interface. Then I’d write out the song on acoustic guitar and mess around with it and try to flesh it out. I had a bunch of demos, some were finished and some were unfinished, and I just chose my favorite five that I felt worked well together. I think the songs flow well. Not really sure what's going to happen to the other music, but we've played a couple of the other songs live.

       As far as inspiration, I was listening to a lot of different music from Philly. Like Blue Smiley or Spirit of the Beehive. I was also writing random poems sometimes really late when I'd get home from work. I feel like you create your best stuff when you're super tired and can't really think properly, you just let things flow out naturally. That's where a lot of lyrics came from: working when it's really late and being alone at home in my basement when no one else was awake. That was the setting most of the music was written in.

 

YOU’RE ORIGINALLY FROM THE DC AREA THEN SPENT TIME IN SYRACUSE FOR SCHOOL AND NOW YOU’RE BACK. WHAT CAUSED THIS CHANGE?

     I went to a music program at the college there that's focused on music business and that's how I first got introduced to DIY. I graduated and finished in May and just moved back here and am doing music and working part time. Syracuse is really dope, there's a great scene there that not many people know about. They’re famous for their hardcore and metal scene, but there's a really good scene for punk and DIY bands and that type of stuff. It's a really supportive place for sure.

 

HOW DID THE FORMATION OF THE LIVE BAND COME ABOUT?

    The bass player Ryan has been one of my best friends for awhile, we went to middle school together and have been hanging out and playing music in different bands all throughout high school. Sam, who usually plays guitar, is my neighbor. We shared a backyard and would jam occasionally growing up and he's a really good guitar player so I asked him to join and he was down. Then I randomly met our drummer Jonas one day, which is a funny story: I was at Chuck Levins, a music store in MD and I was getting my kick pedal repaired and he was also getting something repaired. He commented on my shirt, which was a band tee, and I had been looking for someone to play drums for months at this point so I just asked him if he'd wanna play and he was like “yeah, sure.” And then it actually worked out, which was pretty surprising but very cool. Also we’ve been touring with my good friend, Evan, who I went to school with and he runs a cool show house and plays in a number of other really dope bands.

 

YOU GUYS ARE CURRENTLY FINISHING UP YOUR TOUR WITH MARBLEMOUTH. IS THIS YOUR FIRST TOUR? BEST MEMORIES + LEARNING EXPERIENCES?

     It's been really dope. We chose the worst time ever to tour because it's the coldest week of the year and it's freezing everywhere we go. There was this huge snowstorm in New York the day we were going up and our show got cancelled last minute. It was a bummer but we had some friends in NY and we just chilled and it was still a good time. The other shows we’ve played have been really cool. It's been freezing and people have still come out and all the other bands are super nice and supportive and let us crash at their houses so it's been really surprising how nice people are even though we’re a brand new band and no one really knows us. It's been me, Jonas, Ryan, and Evan for this tour. Marblemouth is Evan’s project, so I've been playing drums with his band, which has also been really cool. It's been fun and chill and nothing has gone terribly wrong so it's been a really good experience so far.

 

WHAT’S IT LIKE BEING A BAND IN THE 21ST CENTURY?

       On one hand, being a band in the 21st century is great because everything is so interconnected and supportive. On the east coast there are so many great scenes and people that are all really different but still super supportive of all types of art and music. Evan and I booked the tour solely through friends and the internet and I feel like that would've been next to impossible before the internet and all that good stuff. On the other hand, the internet and social media is so weird and can be difficult to function within and there is so much to keep up with. It can be exhausting sometimes. I really like being in a band right now and meeting cool people and discovering other great bands. It feels like a really good time for music.

LISTEN HERE

photo by MISH SCANNER

LYDIA VELAZQUEZ