AN INTERVIEW WITH BOYSCOTT

WHAT WAS IT LIKE CREATING YOUR FIRST SONG, “NOVA SCOTIA 500?”

     It was cool, it was weird. This project started off as a solo thing for me. I was in college and in my dorm making stuff on my own and then I met my buddy John and found out he played drums. I had him come hang out and we recorded the song together. Just the two of us, he played drums on it and I did everything else. It was really cool to have that song develop because it went from a project of just me playing all the parts and wishing like ‘aw it’d be sick to have a band someday’ and now to actually have a band playing with us is really cool. That song is totally really important to us for that reason.

 

YOU GUYS LIVE IN NASHVILLE?

     We all go to school here but right now I’m living in New Jersey at my dad's house. He owns a restaurant so I’m working there and it’s been really weird because all of my friends and the band are just down here in the South so anytime they have a break from school I’m driving all the fucking way down there to play shows. But they’re almost graduating so we’ll figure it out.

 

WHAT’S THE MUSIC SCENE LIKE IN NASHVILLE?

      Nashville music scene is really good, really cool. So many bands and so many venues and so many people wanting to book shows - it’s very easy to get a show in Nashville if you know the right people. I mean it’s easier anywhere if you  know the right people. It’s extremely supportive of the community and there's a lot of genres of bands cause a lot of people think it’s just country down here but that's not the case at all. I’m sure there's some good country artists, I don’t actually know them, but it’s a really cool indie scene. It was a really cool place to decide to start to play music. Many shows came our way because there were shows and bands coming through all the time. I’m totally supportive of Nashville. We’re definitely ready to get out and leave but very happy to have started there.

 

IS IT HARDER BEING A SOUTHERN BAND TRYING TO ORGANIZE TOURS SINCE IT’S QUITE SPREAD OUT GEOGRAPHICALLY?

      We did our first tour up north this summer, going up to Maine. We started in New Jersey and then went up to Maine for a week and then did Canada and came back to New York. It was a dream come true and I totally love playing up north. Everything's really close so the drives aren’t too long and everything's so scenic up there, it's like ‘holy crap there's a beach there! there's a lake there!’When we're in the South it’s like ‘oh there’s a lake there but like....it’s kind of trashy.’ We haven't’ toured that much in the South. We did a week where we only played shows in Texas. It was fucking terrible. I like Texas but a whole week in Texas...it was funny. Austin is really cool but dealing with the distance has been weird. Luckily right now we’re trying not to play that many shows and just try to record which is funny that we’re down here just playing shows but we really need to get on recording. It’s cool because truthfully it’s kind of my project so when I have the time on my own it’s really nice cause I can actually focus and tell myself we can’t play shows if we wanted to because I’m 14 hours away from them right now. It’s really good and it’s the perfect timing because they’re going to graduate in May and then we’ll all be able to regroup somewhere.


 

YOU PLAY A LOT OF HOUSE SHOWS. WHAT DO YOU THINK SPACES LIKE THAT DO FOR ARTISTS AND THE COMMUNITY IN GENERAL?

     Oh man we were just talking about that because we were like ‘I don’t know if I could have the power to run a house show because it’s a lot of work and you have a ton of people in your house all the time and then you have to clean up.’ We are really appreciative of the people that do it. We just played in Clemson last night and I was talking to some guys asking ‘oh what's the music scene like here’ and what I found out from talking to a bunch of different people is it just doesn't exist except for those guys. That's incredible because those guys started their scene from one spot - there's no other venue in the city. It’s extremely important and I’m extremely appreciative to all the people that have allowed us to come to their house and play and even sleep there. OH man it’s been so uplifting from touring and meeting people that are doing some incredible stuff like that. It’s incredible, it really is.

 

WHEN YOU WERE CREATING THE ALBUM WAS THERE A SPECIFIC OVERARCHING THEME? A FEELING YOU TRIED TO ENCAPSULATE?

     I love albums that you can really hear something there. I was thinking about being outdoors. I was just cooped up at college, stuck on a campus everyday for four years it was fucking awful. It was fun taking classes but I was like man I’m just stuck here and I can’t leave because I have class the next day. I tried so hard to make music that made me feel like I was somewhere else. Just channel the outdoors and places we wanted. We tried to make it seem like something you could listen to when traveling or on the road. That’s really what I think about when I play those songs - being somewhere else in nature. We're working really hard now with that on our new stuff.

 

WHAT’S THE MOST IMPORTANT SONG TO YOU ON THAT ALBUM?

      “Nova Scotia 500.” That was about a trip I did up in Nova Scotia. I was on a bike trip in high school and it was a huge growing and learning experience for me. That one is the most genuine of the songs from the album. I worked really hard on writing that one even though it’s just one verse and it repeats every time.


 

WHAT DID YOU REMEMBER MOST ABOUT CREATING THIS ALBUM?

       Oh man it was so much fun. We wrote it in the summer after I was finally done with living in a dorm and I moved into a house in Nashville. It was surrounded by woods and was really secluded. I’d just become friends with these guys from Memphis that really pushed me to record the album. My buddy Tiger he came to my house and slept in my closet. I had a cot in my closet and we put glow stars up. It was really magical. I was working this job and I’d come home and we’d record and hang out all night and go to bed and wake up and do it again. I met those friends at the beginning of the summer, they pushed me to record the album, they were there with me when I recorded it, and then they helped me release it. It was a great time, especially having a positive, productive thing come out of it. The whole thing stems from friends and going on hikes with them and aw man, it was awesome.

 

WHAT MADE YOU DECIDE ON THE TITLE GOOSE BUMPS?

     I’ve had that title for some reason for a very long time. I started writing songs in high school but I wouldn’t show them to anyone. I was in another band but I wouldn’t show them the other stuff I was working on. I don’t know why. I think I was self conscious. I had that name on a folder and it had all of my song ideas. I don’t know why it’s called that. It’s not from the TV show or the books, sorry. I’s just cause as cheesy as it is, I kinda got goosebumps thinking about showing people that shit. As lame as that fucking is.

 

WHAT’S NEXT?

     We’re so excited! We’re still a very young band with not a huge following but we’re really excited to keep it going. Those guys are graduating in May and while they’re finishing up school I’m writing and demoing out the new album we’re working on and hopefully this spring we’ll record the new album and release it by summer. I’d love for it to be out by then so then we could just play as many shows as we can with the new stuff. We’re going for it, we decided to focus on it when we graduate and we believe in this new set of songs we’re working on. We’re definitely more confident with them then with the other ones. So that's the plan right now, just play more shows with new songs.

 

WHAT’S IT LIKE BEING A BAND IN THE 21ST CENTURY?

      It’s really weird because it's all about the online thing now.  When you release your stuff it’s a lot different. It used to be all about the record and selling it and now it’s about getting people to listen to it. Pop culture now is so different than it used to be. I was talking to my mom and I was like man when she would listen to the radio they would listen to cool music that was in and now I don’t really listen to the radio at all because I’m not really into the stuff that's the most popular so I think that’s interesting….I don’t know that's a great question. It’s great because I’m listening to so much stuff all the time and there's so much influence everywhere especially when we're talking about online, it’s crazy. It’s definitely hard to be unique when so many people have done so many things and are trying to do the same thing sometimes. I would say it’s weird.

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samantha sullivan