AN INTERVIEW WITH THE MEDIUM

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       In 2017 it seems everyone's gaze is fixated on the future. What’s new, shiny, exciting, bright. For The Medium however, they’re not afraid to look back. Sporting the tag ‘baroque pop,’ their music pulls elements from Beethoven and motorcycle rides, girls they’ve dated and corsets.  Adding their own 21st century edge, the Nashville based band ties their mod pop together with a sense of nostalgia and reflection. Recently the band composed of Shane Perry (guitar/vocals), Sam Silva (bass guitar/vocals), Michael Brudi (guitar/vocals), and Jared Hicks (drums) decided to celebrate the one year anniversary of Here’s Our Gravy Tape by doing a re-release with some of their demos.

 

HOW HAS THE NASHVILLE MUSIC SCENE INFLUENCED YOUR BAND?

      There are a lot of talented bands in Nashville. It definitely keeps us on our toes, sets a high standard for us, keeps us level headed. It doesn't influence us through the sound necessarily, but for work ethic, for being productive, it affects us in that way.

 

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE TO RE-RELEASE HERE’S OUR GRAVY TAPE FOR THE ONE YEAR ANNIVERSARY AND INCLUDE THE NEW DEMOS?

       We didn't give it too much thought, we just wanted to promote it again. We just needed to put some new shit out and show that we've grown. But we also wanted to make the Gravy Tape available on all platforms (Spotify, iTunes, etc).

 

A LOT OF YOUR MUSIC DEALS WITH THEMES OF NOSTALGIA AND MOVING ON. WHY DO YOU FIND SO MUCH INSPIRATION WITH THESE TOPICS IN PARTICULAR?

      These are universal, relatable themes; we haven't reached the future, so we figure we might as well write about the past. We're young and impressionable, we've only had so much life experience. We just write about what we know and that's all there is to it.

 

A LOT OF YOUR DEMOS REALLY EXPERIMENT WITH NEWER SOUNDS LIKE “HAWAII JIVE-0’ AND “YOU’RE STILL THE BEST.” WHAT MADE YOU WANT TO BRANCH OUT? WHAT WAS THAT EXPERIMENTAL PROCESS LIKE?

      For those songs in particular, they were recorded pretty spontaneously. We recorded them at our house on a 1/8" tape machine. For “Hawaii Jive-O,” Michael recorded Sam playing a jazz drum beat, then looped it. Sam then overdubbed guitar and bass one at a time, making it up as he went along. The sound came together naturally as the recording went on. It was fun to record in that way, not being confined to any time limits like you might in a professional studio. Recording at home on your own equipment gives a higher degree of creative freedom.

 

YOU HAVE YOUR MUSIC TAGGED AS ‘BAROQUE POP.’ WHAT DREW YOU TO THIS DESCRIPTION?

      We like Baroque pop because it brings to mind elegance, refined manners, fine wines, and stinky cheese. The bass riff heard throughout “Good Ol Days” was inspired by a Beethoven piano sonata (opus 49 andante, sonata 19 in G major) and the riff over the chorus was written trying to capture a Baroque feel. You can imagine the powdered wigs, candles, corsets, all that jazz.

 

A LOT OF YOUR NEWER TRACKS DON’T HAVE LYRICS. WHY DID YOU DECIDE TO GO WITH JUST INSTRUMENTALS?

     For those songs, we recorded and released them before lyrics were written for them. “Still The Best,” for example, has since been completed. But we felt it would be good for people to hear what we had produced so far, just to give them a little taste of what is to come.

 

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE TO RELEASE A MASTERED VERSION OF “FADE AWAY” INSTEAD OF A DEMO? WHY IS THIS SONG IMPORTANT TO YOU?

      Good question! “Fade Away,” we have noticed seems to have mass appeal. It's a real crowd pleaser, and we wanted to give it a pop sounding production.

 

WHAT CHANGED ABOUT YOUR MUSIC WITH THIS LATEST RELEASE? HOW DOES THE COMPILATION OF THE TWO EPs COMPARE/CONTRAST THOSE CHANGES AND SIMILARITIES?

        Truthfully, the music hadn't really changed much since the initial Gravy Tape release. The new songs on "It's Lit" are basically a collection of demos of songs we've had sitting around for a while. Some were as recent as a few months ago, and some had been recorded over a year ago. The Gravy Tape was more or less recorded in the span of a few weeks in the summer of 2016.

 

WHAT WAS YOUR INSPIRATION FOR THE SONG “SUNDAY MORNING?” WHAT WAS GOING ON WHEN YOU WROTE IT? WHAT DO YOU REMEMBER ABOUT CREATING IT?

      I was depressed because I hadn't written a song in a while, and it was a rehashing of an idea I had that hadn't been used yet. It wasn't raining that Sunday when I wrote it, but I imagined that it was. There was that internal strife. It wasn't really written about anyone. It's about finding a mantra.

 

WHEN YOU WROTE “CAROLINE” WAS THAT FOR SOMEONE IN PARTICULAR OR WAS IT SYMBOLIC OF AN IDEA? WHY DID YOU CHOOSE TO END THE GRAVY TAPE WITH THIS?

     Caroline's just about cute girls, motorcycle rides, having fun. It started out as a joke; there was this girl who wanted to date real bad, but she kinda freaked me out. We went out on a date to some swing dancing thing, and it was actually fun. We jammed for a bit afterwards. I played ukulele, she played guitar. We didn't touch butts, or hook up or anything. I kissed her once, at a later date, I was very drunk. She said 'we could go to an open mic night, write some music, it'll be fun' and I was like 'oh haha great...'. But that's about as far as that went. As far as track listing goes, we didn't make a conscious decision to put that song last on the EP. It was incidental.

LISTEN TO THE MEDIUM HERE

samantha sullivan